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Need Some Fresh Air? Try a Little Wilderness

Posted on Feb 06, 2017 by Sonja Jones

It might seem that fresh air is in short supply this week. The Mayor of London has issued a very high pollution alert and President Trump repealed the Climate Action Plan. In contrast it’s looking nice and fresh in Scotland and Ireland so we’ve lined up our top three places where you can breathe easy.

Get some fresh air by increasing your distance from major sources of pollution such as traffic, industry and commerce. Air quality tends to improve when there is an open aspect because the air moves more freely.

So the wilderness it is then. Who’s with us?

Top 3 places to get some fresh air in Scotland and Ireland:

1. Blow the cobwebs away around Argyll and the Isles

Fewer people generally means less pollution. We make it our business to explore all the nooks and crannies of Scotland and find places with tiny populations. Imagine yourself standing on a deserted beach and gulping down the freshest of air. Join us on the beautiful islands around Argyll and get away from the crowds. The Isles of Jura and Gigha are home to 180 and 160 respectively, and just 34 people live on the tiny isle of Kerrera.

 

 

2. Step out on the Knoydart Peninsula

How about getting away from exhaust fumes by heading to a place cut off from the main road network? The Knoydart Peninsula is situated on the mainland between Loch Nevis and Loch Hourn. You can only arrive by boat or by foot so there are only handful of cars on the roads. The local lichens and flora are evidence of the pristine air and they flourish all around Knoydart. This gem of a place on the very edge of the mainland is close to our hearts. It was here that our inspiration to share Scotland’s wild places really formed.

 

3. Marvel at the Wildflowers of The Burren

Wild flowers thrive in the fresh air

Over on the Emerald Isle County Clare is home to the Burren. The area is renowned for its rocky grey limestone landscape and abundance of flora. In the warmer months it bursts into colour and hosts one of the highest diversities of wild flowers in Europe. Nowhere else in the world do flowers from the arctic and the southern Mediterranean grow together.This is partly due to the high-density light reflecting from the sea and limestone which hasn’t been depleted by air pollution. You can see Bloody Crane’s Bill and Bird’s Foot Trefoil nestling together on a rocky outcrop. 

Come and join us in the wilderness for some fresh air, you’re welcome any time.

About the author

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Sonja Jones

Sonja left the big smoke behind to focus on combining two of her great loves: Scotland and storytelling.

Read more articles by Sonja


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